What Will Be the Smallest Social Security COLA in 2023?

When will COLA for 2023 be announced?

The government sets Social Security benefits based on the average of the past ten years, starting with their January 1st number. If a year has an unusually high or low COLA, then it can be slightly adjusted for in subsequent years. if there is a high amount of inflation in that year, it is expected for Social Security benefits to increase. However, if there is low inflation or deflation in that year, then benefits will be reduced. It has been calculated that the average COLA over the past ten years was 3% – this would be the typical COLA we would see at the start of any given year.

It has also been calculated that Social Security benefits are typically reduced between 0.3% and 0.9% when compared to the three previous years. This reduction can be observed in 2007 and 2014 when there were no percentage increases at all because of deflation during those years.

When Will the COLAs Be Issued?  What Will They Be?

The COLA is just an estimate of what benefit payment will be in the future. It is not a guarantee that something will happen, or that it will happen at all. The government can simply decide to not pay any more. Social Security has never paid out more than 75% of each year’s payroll taxes on average, which have been (at their current rate) $12,000 per person and $788 billion in FY 2016. The COLA has always been published in the Federal Register on the first Friday of January. It is a notice that the government has decided to pay benefits for all current and future Social Security recipients. This can be seen in 2007, when Social Security COLAs were not issued until February.

Therefore, it is likely that we will see a date for the issuing of 2023’s COLA in mid-December of 2015 or early 2016, assuming that there is no further delay and the document has been finalised by then.

What Will Be the Smallest Social Security COLA in 2023?

Social Security benefits are based on taxes paid into the system every year, which is why there’s also no guarantee that the COLA for any particular year will be larger than zero. The government sets Social Security benefits based on the average of the past ten years, starting with their January 1st number. If a year has an unusually high or low COLA, then it can be slightly adjusted for in subsequent years.

The miniscule Social Security COLA increase for 2019 is less than the current rate of inflation. This means Social Security beneficiaries will get a smaller percentage increase in their monthly payments than they would have had if Social Security payments had kept up with inflation since about 2008.

Here are some points;-

1. How Are COLAs Calculated?

The Social Security Administration (SSA) publishes the average of three selected prices reported by the Bureau of Labour Statistics (BLS) for each month of each year. The prices are for the Consumer Price Index for Urban Wage Earners and Clerical Workers (CPI-W), which represents about 79% to 82% of the U.S. population. This is used to calculate COLA. In July, August, and September, BLS reports a less detailed CPI called CPI-U, which includes some of the most expensive goods and services that people typically purchase over the course of a year – such as food and health care services.

2. Who Pays Into Social Security?

Employers are required to pay payroll taxes on their employees’ wages. Employees then pay a tax on the taxable wage base (the first $127,200 of their annual income) on the FICA portion of each paycheck. The employer is required to match the employee contribution (which is 6.2 percent).

3. When Is It Calculated?

Each year, the Bureau of Labor Statistics releases the CPI for the previous year, which is used to determine Social Security benefits adjustments for the following year around October. That information will be used next in 2020 and 2021’s COLA calculations.

4. What if I’m Retired and Haven’t Paid Into Social Security?

You will still receive a cost-of-living adjustment (COLA) each year, based on the COLA increase for that year. But, you will not receive any benefits.

5. What If I’m Employed and Don’t Pay Into Social Security?

You can still receive cost-of-living increases (COLAs) based on the COLA increase for that year. These payments are made regardless of your contributions, but they’re a smaller amount than if you were making contributions.

6. What if I’m Retired and Am Still Making Contributions To Social Security?

If you’re retired and paying into Social Security, then you’ll receive a smaller COLA payment each year than someone who isn’t drawing retirement benefits.